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Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system

 




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keithkoi
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Dec 20, 2002, 7:54 AM

Post #1 of 73 (78403 views)
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Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system Can't Post

Anyone out there with experience in this unique but simple mechanical filter system?
http://photos.yahoo.com/keithkan8

Read a lot of good reviews.
Is there a sole agent in S'pore or Malaysia for it?


(This post was edited by keithkoi on Dec 20, 2002, 8:24 AM)


cby
Novice

Dec 20, 2002, 9:51 AM

Post #2 of 73 (78326 views)
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Hi Keith,

I'm Boonyong, as koikichi as all these great guys in this forum, and also always facinated with technology. I am presently building my new house and was thus investigating filtration systems for the new pond.

I went to Singapore to look at The Answer and was so convinced by the product and the distributor that I decided to bring it to Malaysia, hopefully to help subsidise a bit my future koi purchases!

Back in August, my friend bought over a bungalow with 12 2ft koi and 26 1ft+ koi which he did not want so I bought them over. I put them in two 8*4ft fiberglass tanks, each with a pump feeding into a prime tank containing The Answer. The bio-filter is the standard 4*1*2ft ones that sit on top of the main tank, one with jap mat and oystershell and zeolite, and the other with K1 media instead of japmat.

Dr Tan and a few others in this forum visited in Sept but the water was green and I had been struggling with getting it consistently clear all this while till last couple of weeks. All the while that the water was green, ph was running at 7.4, ammonia 0, nitrite 0.1, nitrate 5 (I'm suspecting the nitrate test is "off" given the low reading but still green water) and KH 20, GH 60. So the water was not so bad and because I was very busy with work, I couldn't do much tweeking to the system.

As you can imagine, the capacity of water relative to fish means that the tanks are really overstocked and I only got round to selling two of them. Sensing that I needed additional filtration capacity, I did add another barrel containing bioballs but that didn't help.

Getting fedup of the green water, I started to think what would be the best course of action. Seeing that the 24 smaller koi in the K1 media tank were more active, I decided first to get more K1 for all the bio chambers. When I had The Answer brought in, there wasn't enough K1 in stock so I made do with whatever was available.

Leaving at least one japmat at the bottom of the biofilter to "transfer" the bacteria, I repalced all the media with K1 and added heavy airation to the bio chambers. That was last Sunday and in 3 days, the water cleared with all the fish now highly active and increasingly fed to "make up" for the times when I had to feed very little in order to try clearing the water.

My conclusion is that the K1 definately has a much larger surface area for bacteria to grow than jap mat (quite clever the shape of it as you get exterior and interior surface of the volume!). Add to this efficient biological filtration The Answer for mechanical filtration, you have a system that really works very well.

Looking at the overstocked condition and the water measurements that I was experiencing even without the K1, I think The Answer must have helped to reduce the load in the bio stage substantially. Afterall, it is designed to let nothing larger than 100 microns through to the biostage.

In January, I will have the all in one Nexus unit which houses The Answer and K1 bio stage in a cylindrical tank that is around 1m in height and diameter; this unit can handle a pond capacity for up to 13 tons for our tropical climate. A smaller Answer can be fitted for pond up to 9 tons.

The set-up is in my house in Bangsar where you, or anyone in the forum is more than welcome to see it so you can understand it better. I am reachable at 012-2099030 and after Xmas would be a good time as I taking a few days off to look at my fish!Smile

Just for your info, The Answer comes in 3 sizes and the limiting factor is the flow rate that you need to consider, where the water turnover rate is recommended at once per hour.

Model 250 - 6 ton pond - 250 micron screen - RM3800

Model 325 - 10 ton pond - 150 micron screen - RM5000

Model 410 - 13 ton pond - 100 micron screen - RM6800

For larger ponds, any combination of additional Answers will need to be fitted to get a water turnover rate of once per hour.

If you need more information, please see www.evolutionaqua.com or give me a call.

Regards,

boonyong



keithkoi
User

Dec 20, 2002, 11:44 AM

Post #3 of 73 (78315 views)
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Re: [cby] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Hi boonyong,
Thanks for sharing the filter experience, will give you a tingle should I be in this part of the region.Wink
BTW is there a dealer in S'pore?

FYI, I'm in the midst of designing my new pond will need advice on pond bottom drain pipe sizing.

Question for all experts out there: For a 3 inch main pond bottom drain pipe to my gravity fed filters, what flowrate (mtr/sec) should I achieve in order to avoid debris settling in my pipes? And what pump flowrate? My pond size is 10ftx5ftx4ft.
Thanks in advance.


(This post was edited by keithkoi on Dec 20, 2002, 12:05 PM)


an148
Novice

Dec 20, 2002, 5:52 PM

Post #4 of 73 (78297 views)
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Hi Keith

I have just recently modified my filter system to the Answer + K1 media. I am now running 2 Answers which flows into the biological K1 media chamber which is about 180 litres and heavily aerated. Previously, I was running the Jap Mat system but that has now all been taken out. With The Answer, the Jap Mat is no longer a necessity. I feel that this is better as Jap Mats can get really really dirty and it also contributed to a Midge problem.

My system has been in place for about 2 months now, and the water is really much much improved. Its crystal clear, you can see right to the bottom drain. And my pond depth is 6.5ft, which says a lot about the improvement to the water condition. Still, at this point in time, my K1 media has not become 'brown' yet. It will eventually become brown when the system fully matures, so I think the water condition will probably be able to improve still.

However, I still have a yellow tinge to the water and the algae in my pond is quite a lot. This is in part contributed to the location of my pond which is exposed to sunlight. The DOC level of my pond should also be above average as there are white foams around the edges of the pond still. The Answer and K1 probably cannot address the issue of DOC in a pond, which is why I am in the process of installing a turbo cleaner to minimise the DOC level, which hopefully, will get rid of that yellow tinge.

The Answer and K1 media is a very good combination, I am one pretty satisfied customer. However, the cost of this 2 are not cheap. It is actually on the expensive side. There is a dealer in Singapore who I believe is the exclusive agent for the Answer and K1 media in Singapore. You can look for Max Koi for further information.

Alan


keithkoi
User

Dec 21, 2002, 6:16 PM

Post #5 of 73 (78274 views)
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Thanks Alan, will seriously consider the proposed option (Answer & K1 combo). If I finally settle on this option is there a possibility of seeing the Answer & K1 in action? I'm currently putting up in Bukit Timah and do travel a lot, need to plan my scheduleWink
As I'm still in the midst of designing my first above ground pond (no digging for now) and filter system will need to clarify a few more queries before plunging in ... hope you can helpSmile
1) What Bottom drain flow rate to prevent settling in the 3" pipe leading to the 1st settlement chamber.
2) Any experience on using pond liner over concrete or FG? Dealer in S'pore?
Thanks again!


an148
Novice

Dec 22, 2002, 10:49 AM

Post #6 of 73 (78259 views)
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Re: [keithkoi] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Keith

I'm didnt use any pond liner for my pond so cant advise you on that. Plus, I'm not certain I can answer your first question either as I'm not quite a koi expert. But if you dont mind spending on your filter, then I would agree that the Answer and K1 system is the way to go.

Alan


dttk
Veteran

Dec 23, 2002, 3:54 AM

Post #7 of 73 (78244 views)
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Hi Keithkoi, there is no fixed answer to your question. The flow rate via the bottom drain to your filter will have to be such that the entire pond volume gets filtered once every 1-2 hours. This is assuming that the bottom drains are the only feeds to the filter, that is, no midwater feeds. If the waste settles in the horizontal piping, that is absolutely alright for as soon as you flush it, the waste collected in the piping will be carried into the dry sump. If the piping slopes towards the 1st chamber, the waste will probably roll down and settle there. Hope you understand what I mean. Smile
Always friendly :)


keithkoi
User

Dec 23, 2002, 4:28 AM

Post #8 of 73 (78240 views)
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Re: [dttk] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Thanks guys, appreciate you views and inputs, sure gave me the assurance that I'm at least heading the right way in my very first pond adventure.
I must also admit that I have been too caught up in the venture for the best pond hardware and know hows that I've lose sight of the fundamentals of koi keeping, is to enjoy the beauty and the company of healthy kois.
Then again to have healthy kois one must...how ironical it seems, that's what been keeping us going in this hobby!


(This post was edited by keithkoi on Dec 23, 2002, 4:58 AM)


patrick123
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Dec 23, 2002, 1:13 PM

Post #9 of 73 (78210 views)
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Dear All,

Sorry to sound like I'm singing an opposite tune and it is not like I'm completely disguised with The Answer and K1, but I have encountered numerous problems with this setup and I would like to share with all of you. May be you need to consider these fine points and then decide for yourself if it is the right setup for you.

I'm using 1 x "The Answer" model 410 and it is supposed to be able to handle up to 13,000L/hr. However, my design is such that there are two bottom drains going into a pump sump, and the water in the pump sump is pump fed to an overhead filter that consist of the answer (chamber 1), oyster shells and some bio rings/mat (chamber 2), K1 200Liters (chamber 3) and 2600xbio balls (chamber 4). The whole system is about 10 ton of water.

My problem is this:

1. The pump I’m using to pump the water to the overhead filter box runs at 13,000L/hr. However, the answer model 410 does not seems to be able to handle this flow rate. The water keep raising to a level that it automatically overflow to the next chamber (bypass the answer). This is a safety feature so that if the answer is clog, the water will still circulate through the filter. After talking to Max koi, they advised me to install a valve to regulate the flow, and I believe I’m only running at about 7000-8000L/hr now.

2. Even with that, the answer is always clog with algae….within a few days, the screen of the answer is so clog up that I have to either physically remove the algae, or have to flush the whole chamber and wash down the answer. Otherwise, the overflow kicks in again.

3. Eventually, I have to install a fish net at the input of the water from the pump to catch the string algae before they get stuck on the answer's screen.

4. The K1 seems to take forever to mature. According to Max Koi, some owner only run the K1 for 2 weeks and it is already turning dark brown. Mine…..after 3 months of running, is light yellow color. And you guess it, the surface has a lot of bubble even though I’m using a turbo cleaner. I’m not sure what is so different about the other owner setup that I’m not doing.

5. Recently, I have increased the aeration in the K1 chamber (almost ½ of my hiblow 80 output go to the k1). The water has been crystal clear even before I adjusted the aeration. However, whenever I do heavy feeding, the bubble still comes back.

6. I guess eventually the material and the answer will work around themselves with the ego-system…until then, I have not experience any wowing performance or accerated maturity on the materials that some people claimed.

7. Another friend of mine is using the answer also have the same headache with the answer on string algae.

Any comments or help will be much appreciated.

Cheers,
Patrick


crazoo
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Dec 23, 2002, 3:58 PM

Post #10 of 73 (78204 views)
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probably it was not designed to suit our wheather condition.
if u heavy feed your kois its not fair to say the otherwise as probably the filter is working fine but when over feading occurs naturally equals to more pooh and the filter capacity is tested to the max probably.

just a piece of thought..
dont worry it will one day mature for sure.. certainly this is a point to ponder since its one of the few groans ive heard so far.


patrick123
Veteran


Dec 24, 2002, 5:12 AM

Post #11 of 73 (78188 views)
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crazoo,

You are right on the point. But don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that the answer and k1 is anymore inferior than the conventional filteration system. It is just that I'm a little disappointed that it didn't "knock my sock off".

Cheers,
Patrick


cby
Novice

Dec 24, 2002, 9:34 AM

Post #12 of 73 (78172 views)
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Patrick,

Thanks for sharing your experience... it is only with honest feedback that we can all learn and that this forum serves its purpose.

Firstly, the flow rate is affected by the resistance that the water has to flow through in the bio stages. The manufacturer's claimed flow rates are the maximum which I would expect is when the water merely goes through the mesh to an empty container. When the water has to flow through the biological media, there is resistance which will affect the flow rate.

Of course the the string algae getting stuck on the mesh doesn't help. I am wondering how the water is coming into chamber 1 as it is imperative for the water coming into the Answer's chamber to be around the mid point of the mesh height so that there is a downward flow. This helps the solids and algae settle to the bottom.

String algae can be problematic as it tends to hook onto the mesh (like velcro) and difficult to dislodge by the backwash water jet, thus cloging up the filter. I have found that it is important to let all the air out of The Answer for the backwash jet to be at its best. I do this by putting the cover on after the water has risen above the mesh (close valve to bio chamber first to let the water level rise).

Solutions to a lot of string algae is a) like you have done by having a net to capture the algae prior to The Answer, or b) install a UV to kill the algae. It is also good to clean the mesh with soda solution to rid it of the film of grime from time to time (pls refer to product instructions).

Out of curiosity, is the nitrate high and is that the cause of the algae growth? If it is, then I suggest you increase the efficiency of the biological stage and get the nitrate down so the algae would not grow.

The manufacturer's claim is that the K1 has 4 times the surface area of Japanese mats. My personal experience is that by substituting the mats for K1 while all else remained the same, it brought the nitrate down and got rid of the green water. What I did do was also to leave a mat at the bottom of the chamber to facilitate colonisation and also add some dry bacteria to help the K1 mature faster. The K1 does like heavy airation so that the media is churning round and round. Watch a particular piece of K1 and ensure that it is getting churned downwards as it moves to the sidewalls.

I'm curious as to why the shells are in chamber 2 as opposed to the last one where it is normally recommended. Might it make a difference to swap chamber 2 and 4 around? (can someone answer that?) If nitrate is present, I suggest you substitue the bioballs with K1.

As for surface scum and bubbles, after substituting Japmat with K1, the bubbles has been reduced.

Hope that helps.

regards,

boonyong


patrick123
Veteran


Dec 24, 2002, 11:54 AM

Post #13 of 73 (78158 views)
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Boonyong,

Thanks for your posting and constructive suggestions. Here are some answers to your questions.

1. The water enters the mech chamber at the top and above the answer. It enters the chamber off centered instead of in the middle of the chamber, so as to generate a spiral effect for the particles to settle at the bottom of the vortex.

2. There is no problem for solid to settle at the bottom. The problem is with algae, they just like to float around and stuck to the mesh.

3. I do make sure that all the air are out of the answer by releasing the “bleed screw” on top to let the air escape.

4. For the nitrate level, the last I checked 2 weeks ago before I went overseas was 40mg/l. I have an 18W UV light running 24/7. You might be wondering why I have such algae problem. This is because my pond is totally expose to 100% direct sunlight for 8 hours a day (9am – 5pm). The temperature of water is around 29 degrees celcius. I know is not very good for the koi.

5. For 40mg/l of nitrate, I believe this is acceptable level. I suspect this is due to the k1 and the 2600 bio balls I have in the TT (chamber 4).

6. Many people ask me why the shells are in Chamber 2 instead of last chamber. The actual reason is that the K1 chamber need to have water flowing from the top and leaving from the bottom…so that the K1 does not float away. Since the outflow of water from the answer is at the bottom, I cannot have K1 at the 2nd chamber. Also, I cannot take out the bio balls from the 4th chamber as this is the dry chamber for my TT. If I put the bioballs in the 2nd chamber, they will no longer be dry (submerse in water).

7. You won’t believe how much liquid and dry bacteria I have used so far since I started the pond. It is at least 4 liters of liquid bacteria and 1 big container of dry bacteria.


Questions:

1. Any idea how long does it take the K1 to turn from white to dark brown? And is dark brown the desired condition that we want the K1 to be?

2. For a pond of 8 ton with 2 ton of water for filter, is 200L of K1 enough? If not, I don’t know where else to put more as I’m running out of space in my chambers.

Any more ideas or suggestion will be greatly appreciated.

Cheers,
Patrick


cby
Novice

Dec 28, 2002, 10:39 AM

Post #14 of 73 (78110 views)
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Re: [patrick123] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Patrick,

1. You need to stop the spinning water in the vortex by putting a barrier so that the water flow up and then down to create a downward current that encourages the solids to fall to the bottom, or to fix a pipe as show in diagram of www.evolutionaqua.com "operation" page. The problem with spinning water is that you are forcing all the solids to the middle where The Answer is, i.e. you are constantly pushing the string algae towards the mesh and hence it is getting stuck there!

2. The bleed screw only works for removing air if the unit is installed upside down. Because the mesh is so fine, in the upright installation, the "safest" ways to ensure that all the air is out is by putting on the lid after the water has risen above the lid level. Do check always that the water jet is working by feeling the mesh for pulses created by the water jet.

3. I use a simple solution of using my "redundent" jap mats as blockades to prevent the K1 from moving to another chamber. I just cut them to fit firmly as water passable vertical extensions of the chamber wall, be it upflow or downflow. You may want to use this method to split your K1 chamber into 2 so that the movement and churning of the K1 is easier as it is not one big mass. BTW, what are the dimensions of the K1 chamber? You can fill it with K1 only to a max of 67% to ensure there is freedom of movement, minimum is 50%. Key here is that the K1 needs to be turning over like mixing dough so arrange the airstone positions so that the churning happens. It should look like the water is boiling and not just simmering where the media stays stationary.

4. My experience is that the K1 turned brown in 3 months and yes that is the indication that it is covered with bacteria.

5. My two 8x4 FG tanks, the filters and the prime tank that holds The Answer totals around 5 tons and I have used 100liters of K1. My tanks are also exposed to sun all day though I have cover nets that prevent the fish from jumping out and also add some shade by attaching shade nets that they use for growing plants. If you think the sun is causing the algae, maybe you can add some shade nets but that's still not killing the root problem bringing the nitrate down further to starve off the algae.

My suggested course of action would be as follows:
  1. stop the spinning in the vortex. Hopefully this should help your Answer stay clean and the flow rate can be increased.
  2. increase airation to K1 so that churning is happening.
  3. add shade nets if desired.
  4. all else failing, dump the bioballs and TT and use that chamber for more K1 which is stipulated to also remove nitrate.


Hope that helps.

Regards,

boonyong


cby
Novice

Dec 28, 2002, 11:20 AM

Post #15 of 73 (78108 views)
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Re: [patrick123] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Patrick,

Just found this article from the www.ACKA.org site.

GREEN WATER

Although it is sometimes called an algae bloom, normally the names it is called are unprintable. For some, it seems to happen every Spring (also sometimes in the Fall). For others, it is almost a way of life.

A limited number of pond keepers have never or rarely experienced this "wonder" of nature. It is said that the Koi thrive in it, but you cannot see them to tell if they are thriving or not. You have heard many reasons why your water turns green and tried assorted mechanical wizardry and various chemical concoctions to clear it, (which may or may not have been harmful to your Koi), but it is still green.

There is a lot of "snake oil" out on the market to clear green water.

Green water is caused by an excessively large number of tiny organisms in the water. Called phytoplankton, these minute plants are part of the algae family that has thousands of distinct species found in water (and ice) throughout the world. These organisms are very small, with the most common ones found in our ponds being around 15 microns (0.0006 inches) in diameter. All pond water contains large numbers of different kinds of these plants and other microorganisms. Water that appears to be crystal clear just doesn't have as many.

Some of the statements that follow are somewhat controversial, but they are based on several years of research and experimentation dealing with the subject. From this research, I have concluded that within our biologic converters, a third group of bacteria exist. When these heterotroph bacteria consume dead algae in an aerobic environment, they release an enzyme, possibly used to help them digest the dead algae. The flow of water through the media carries surplus amounts of this enzyme back into the pond where it kills off the other algae.

This enzyme appears to be effective against many species of string algae as well as the bloom algae. It does not seem to have as much effect on the string algae which is only partially submerged or within a high flow area, i.e. in a splashing brook or around a waterfall. This may have to do with contact time requirements. The short blackish-green mat algae found on the walls of a "healthy" pond is composed primarily of dead string algae which is also believed to be a result of control by the antibiotic. Further, this mat area may also be providing a portion of the enzyme as it is being broken down by the heterotroph bacteria.

This seems to explain what we see in our ponds much better than many of the traditional myths which I believe arise from invalid extrapolations and application of true scientific findings based on studies of large lakes and oceans. Most of these findings just simply do not apply to the essentially closed environment of an established, circulating Koi pond. We will discuss only two of the myths here. For more and a detailed description of the experiments leading to these conclusions, see my article in the

Mar-Apr 1998 issue of KOI USA.

MYTH: Pond algae blooms are primarily related to various nutrient concentrations in the water such as nitrate and/or phosphate.

FACT: There is no evidence to substantiate any relationship between nutrient levels and the inception or termination of the common algae blooms in most Koi ponds. Quite to the contrary, the measurable nutrient levels are normally so high, most questions should be why the algae bloom is not continuous.

Commercial laboratory analysis consistently show very high concentrations of all required nutrients.

These concentrations are much higher than could be expected to prevent such an event. Further, most of these levels actually show a slight increase after a heavy bloom subsides.

MYTH: Providing shade over the pond will prevent an algae bloom.

FACT: It is true that algae needs light to grow and reproduce. But what is interesting is the small amount of light that is actually required. Controlled experiments using reduction in sun light of 90% still show significant algae growth. There are many examples of ponds that are heavily shaded but quite green and just as many others with direct sun exposure that have no algae bloom problems at all. There have been positive results reported of completely covering a pond suffering from green water with an opaque plastic cover for 5-10 days. I'm not too sure what the Koi think about this but it is obviously not an acceptable permanent solution. I do recommend providing shade over a pond, but more for temperature stability than for algae control.

So, what is the solution? It seems to be simply a properly sized biologic converter and a proper flow rate of oxygenated water through it. The bio-converter must be large enough to support the heterotroph bacteria colonies which need considerably more space than just the nitrification bacterial colonies. This has led to two rules of thumb. The first is that the amount of water in the pond and filter system should be circulated through the bio-converter at least once per hour.

Second is that a flow rate of approximately 150 gallons per hour per square foot of media should be used. As an example of a 1500 gallon pond, we should be moving 1500 gallons of water through the bio-converter each hour and the bio-converter cross sectional area exposed to water flow should be 10 square feet. The thickness of the media is determined by the media selection.

Bubble bead or similar type pressurized filters do not generally have sufficient internal surface area to support the heterotroph colonies necessary for the enzyme production although they can provide the area necessary for the smaller nitrification colonies. They do an excellent job of capturing the dead algae and other solids. During the frequent backwashing processes, however, the dead algae and much of the heterotroph bacterial colonies are removed from the system giving insufficient time for the enzyme to be produced. This is why ponds using these type filters almost always require an ultraviolet system to handle the green water problem. A properly sized UV system will do a good job on eradicating the bloom algae. It will not affect the string algae, only the phytoplankton that actually pass through the unit. There are also some indications that the UV radiation may destroy or at least weaken any enzyme action.




dttk
Veteran

Dec 29, 2002, 3:51 AM

Post #16 of 73 (78095 views)
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Sounds familiar Smile. I think I've posted the same before Wink.

www.koi.com.my/cgi-bin/koiforum/gforum.cgi?post=16204;search_string=Norm%20Meck;#16204

It's a very interesting article. Thanks anyway. Sly
Always friendly :)


patrick123
Veteran


Dec 30, 2002, 2:58 PM

Post #17 of 73 (78063 views)
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Boon Yong,

You have been extremely helpful...how I wish the dealer I bought the equipment from is as helpful as you.

In any case, most of the suggestion you mentioned have been tried.

1. There is not much spinning in the vortex. The debris does settle at the bottom. Only the algae clog the answer screen.
2. The aeration to the K1 is already at the highest. It looks like the chamber is boiling rather than churning.
3. I'm planning to install a pergola...at this moment, it is 100% expose to sunlight.
4. I am losing confidence on K1...it has been three months and the color is still light yellow. If situation does not improve, i may buy more jap met to put in my oyster shell chamber.

In any case, I may have found a solution for the algae problem. I put in 3 layers of jap mat in the answer chamber on top of the answer so that water flowing into the mech chamber has to go through the jap mat first. For the first day, the answer screen did not clog with in a few hours...this is good news. I will continue to monitor and let you guys know.

Cheers,
Patrick


cby
Novice

Dec 30, 2002, 4:55 PM

Post #18 of 73 (78062 views)
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Re: [patrick123] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Patrick,

I get a lot out of this forum so it is just my way of giving back... so you are very welcome. I am still very puzzled that the algae should clog the screen in a few hours. Please confirm that when you put your hand on the screen that you can feel the water jet pulse that backflushes the screen every couple of seconds or so.

In any case, the japmat solution is good because it will help to reduce any spin in the vortex. Any amount of spin will push solids towards the screen so it is very important to have NO spin at all and only top flowing down. Keep me posted. I am in Spore quite often for business so would be glad to pop by and see if I can be of any help when I'm down.

I sincerely suggest you stick with the K1 for a while yet cos the water parameters are fine. While the newly added K1 in my filters are still white, the water parameters that have resulted since adding the K1 suggests that they are doing their job regardless of color.

Regards,

boonyong


patrick123
Veteran


Jan 3, 2003, 5:17 PM

Post #19 of 73 (78025 views)
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Re: [cby] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Boonyong,

Just to give you guys an update. I did a water parameter test today.... these are the readings:

Ammonia = 0mg/l
Nitrite = 0mg/l
Nitrate = 10mg/l

Yes, that's right, it drop from 40mg/l the last time I tested until now 10mg/l. I don't know if I should thank the bioballs in the TT or the K1..... but don't ask me to take out one of them to experiment....I'm not that brave. Cool

For the jap mat on top of the answer, it solve the problem of having the screen blocked in a few hours...however, it only lasted for a few days...yesterday I checked, it overflow again.....in any case, I have also put in jap mat at the overflow....so may be 60% of the water is going through the answer, and 40% of the water is just going through jap mat as mech filter right now.

The water condition seems to be good...water is crystal clear...have not seen this kind of sparkle for a while....but the surface is still having some fine bubbles.....when I went to visit a few koi farm, I found that their fully matured pond also have the same type of fine bubble floating...so I guess this is normal.

Any comments is appreciated.

Thanks,
Patrick


SMW1
Veteran

Jan 3, 2003, 8:08 PM

Post #20 of 73 (78018 views)
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Re: [patrick123] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

There are three main elements that will cause foaming or bubbles.

Nitrate, DOC or Protien.


patrick123
Veteran


Jan 5, 2003, 4:52 AM

Post #21 of 73 (78001 views)
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Re: [SMW1] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Stuart,

Good to hear from you again. Hope everything is fine with yourself and your family.
Also, happy new year to you.

For the three things you mentioned: Nitrate, DOC and protein, for Nitrate, my reading is around 10mg/l, for DOC and protein, I have a turbo cleaner running 24/7. I guess things may improve further if I wait for another few weeks.

Will keep you guys informed.

Thanks,
Patrick


cwnchong
Koi Kichi

Jan 6, 2003, 2:32 AM

Post #22 of 73 (77987 views)
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Re: [patrick123] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Patrick,
Just to share with you about my experience on the subj of bubble in the pond. I notice bubbles when I use Neutrofin Di-Chro (spelling?) on salted pond. The bubbles will remain there for weeks.
Cheers


patrick123
Veteran


Jan 6, 2003, 10:58 AM

Post #23 of 73 (77960 views)
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Re: [cwnchong] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Cwnchong,

I have not experience the product you mentioned but I have once tried to apply KLEAR, Nutripak and Sludgebuster in my pond and I realized that there were a lot of bubbles for 2 days until the turbo cleaner removed them out. The bubbles were transparant and colored...kind of like detergent bubble. CrazyCrazyCrazy

Cheers,
Patrick


SMW1
Veteran

Jan 6, 2003, 12:25 PM

Post #24 of 73 (77955 views)
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Re: [patrick123] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Hi Patrick Happy New year to yo and your family also Wink.

So many chemicals Shocked. Did you put this lot in at the same time ?.


patrick123
Veteran


Jan 6, 2003, 12:35 PM

Post #25 of 73 (77952 views)
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Re: [SMW1] Effective mechanical Pond Filter - ''The Answer'' system [In reply to] Can't Post

Stuart,

Good to hear from you again. To answer your question, unfortunately Yes.....The KLEAR is a liquid bacteria. They suggest to top up on weekly basis. The nutripak is the nutrients for the bacteria and the sludgebuster....is again bacteria for sludge.

Anyway, I have learned not to put in too much chemical anymore.

Did you finally get your $50 prize from the magazine? Saw your picture on the magazine LaughLaughLaugh....was that your pond in the back ground?

Cheers,
Patrick

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